The Art of Automotive Customisation

It is an art form. I think in a way, to the automotive enthusiast, keeping a car the way it left the factory applies the same feeling as wearing a mass produced high street garment. Granted it would appeal to the masses and no doubt be popular, but it just wouldn’t have that touch of uniqueness – to make it stand out from the crowd. Having said that, there are many examples which in my eyes shouldn’t be altered from their original inception. Many of these are classics for example the Aston Martin DB5, Jaguar E-Type, 1967 Ford Mustang, Ferrari 250 GT California and the list goes on. This in a way is the preservation of history – keeping with us the panels which were so passionately beat out by the bare hands of precision metal workers all those years ago. You’d be a fool to tinker with such astonishing beauty.

Ferrari 250 GT California - via Ultimate Car Page

Ferrari 250 GT California – via Ultimate Car Page

In today’s era however, having something special alone isn’t quite adequate. You’d think that a fresh-out-of-the-showroom Lamborghini Aventador would satisfy anyone who glanced its way. But then you’d be walking down Brompton Road in Knightsbridge and turn the corner and guess what – your eyes would become fixated on another Aventador. This is where the line is drawn between the Automotive enthusiast and just a wealthy owner. An ever increasing number of individuals want their car to feature something which you won’t see too often. I personally view cars as an Artist’s canvas – you make it your own, express yourself, and add your own personal touches through the use of Aftermarket Parts and both “Form” or “Function” defining customisations. The amazing thing is, it doesn’t matter what you drive. Anyone can do it – which is why in this sense it is a form of fashion. It brings people together, gets everyone talking. I have met so many cool people and have friends for life, all because I chose to treat my cars as pieces of Lego, taking them apart and putting them back together time and again, with a differing result on each occasion.

This growing culture has over the years given rise to many Aftermarket companies and workshops who offer an amazing selection of additional bits and pieces for your pride and joy. Not everything will appeal to everyone, as is the case with custom designer pieces – but as with everything in this world it’s all about what floats your boat, what make you happy, what defines you.

Here are a few examples of recent customisation that caught my eye. Enjoy.

 

Lamborghini Aventador by Vorsteiner Nero

via David Coyne Photography

via David Coyne Photography

via Vorsteiner

via Vorsteiner

 

Liberty Walk Ferrari 458 Italia

via SpeedHunters

via SpeedHunters

via SpeedHunters

via SpeedHunters

 

Range Rover Sport by A.Kahn Design

via KahnDesign.com

via KahnDesign.com

via KahnDesign.com

via KahnDesign.com

 

Ferrari F12 Novitec N-Largo

via ByDesign Motorsport

via ByDesign Motorsport

via ByDesign Motorsport

via ByDesign Motorsport

 

RWB Porsche 911 [964]

via petrolicious.com

via petrolicious.com

via petrolicious.com

via petrolicious.com

The Rauh-Welt Begriff 911 contradicts what I said earlier about classic cars. A rare occasion of modern styling being successfully infused with an older vehicle. I absolutely love how outrageous it is with the wide arches and oversized rear wing, all the while keeping with the original feel of Stuttgart. I have huge admiration for the company’s founder Nakai-San from Japan, who not only looks after the exterior, but takes care of performance modifications too. He is one of those unconventional individuals with a natural eye for artistry and craftsmanship. The tarmac is the catwalk for such designers and it just goes to show, anything is possible.

 

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